Federal Reserve

Uncategorized, Weekly Update

Higher Interest Rates Won’t Kill the Stock Market


Published March 2, 2018

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This week we share some good information from a webcast given by Charlie Bilello of Pension Partners. The first chart shows the downward trend of the 10-year U.S. Treasury yield. Note the green arrows as the yield hits the upper portion of the channel. We are sitting right at the top of the channel. Do we want to see yields break through to the upside? (more…)

Uncategorized, Weekly Update

The Bear Awakens and TimingCube Responds Well


Published February 9, 2018

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After two years of nearly non-stop gains punctuated by a vertical ascent to kick off 2018, the stock market finally ran out of gas this week. Those two years brought investors a +60% return in the S&P 500 and a +75% rise in our focus Nasdaq 100 (QQQ) index. This rally was of historic length and ease, with volatility dormant. This week, the bears got their long-awaited time to shine. Not one but two days of 1000 point plunges in the Dow Jones Industrial Average – each a record for raw point declines in the index. Monday afternoon through Tuesday morning saw volatility unleashed in a fury never seen before; the evaporation of one or more volatility-based securities causing a run on the volatility futures market. (more…)

Uncategorized, Weekly Update

A New Bull Market


Published September 22, 2017

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While many in the industry speculate on the coming end to a years-long bull market, there are others who argue that the bull market has just begun. How does this disagreement come about? (more…)

Weekly Update

Global Markets are Relatively Cheap


Published April 7, 2017

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Below is an excerpt from a recent commentary by investment firm Per Sterling that we think provides a good overview of the perspective of many market analysts at this point. Of course, TimingCube’s models are not driven by any of the fundamental or valuation factors described in this article; but instead are focused on price and volume in the market (e.g. supply and demand). (more…)